Walking About Javea

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Walking About Javea

walking about javea

WALKING IN JAVEA

There is a lot more to Jávea than just the sea, the sun, and the sangria. The municipality provides plenty of opportunities for walkers of all ages and abilities, beginning with the enormous hulking mass of Montgó, which extends its protective arm into the sea, and ending with the wide open natural spaces of Granadella to the south. Both of these features are located in the municipality’s Granadella neighborhood. There are five approved routes, totaling over 45 kilometers of trails that open up the splendor of both the countryside and the coastline. These paths are ideal for taking a leisurely stroll in the afternoon along the sea cliffs or for making an intense, all-day ascent to the peak of a mountain. You might take a leisurely amble that winds through the orange trees that dot the plain, or you can go on an educational excursion through the twisting alleyways of the ancient center. There are also more strenuous strolls that can be taken to the castle of Granadella or to the famous windmills of La Plana, in addition to the amazing carved carverns of Cova Tallada. There are other tough scrambles that lead to the large open hollow that is often known as the “Eye of Montgó,” as well as the very summit of Montgó, which is almost 750 meters above sea level and dominates the town to the north.

Aitana, the highest mountain in the region at 1,559 meters, and the mysterious Barranco del Infierno, a popular hiking destination that is also known as “La Catedral del Senderismo” – the “Hiking Cathedral” – can be explored on the challenging PR CV-147, a 15 kilometer route that boasts some 6,000 steps carved by the Moorish population that once lived in the area.

THE AUTHORIZED HIKING TRAILS

The unique network of walking paths that Jávea has to offer is one of the very best ways to explore the stunning natural scenery and coastline that the city has to offer. There are walks suitable for people of all abilities, ranging from leisurely strolls along the headland of Cap Prim to strenuous ascents to the peak of Montgó, allowing visitors to take in the beautiful natural scenery of the region. The five trails, which were developed by the Department of Tourism, have a combined length of almost 45 kilometers and provide visitors with access to a diverse range of ecosystems and landscapes, in addition to showcasing some of the architectural and cultural traditions of the area. A free guided service for these routes is provided by the council and is offered through the Tourist Office. Throughout the year, there are almost 30 different excursions available. This service also includes the well-known annual nighttime traverse across the mountain of Montgó. This unique outing begins at approximately midnight and typically concludes with breakfast and a refreshing swim in the sea afterward.

THE CHALLENGE OF THE MIRADOR

The Mirador Challenge is an endurance walk that covers a medium distance of around 29 kilometers and joins a network of 15 views located along the beautiful coastline of Jávea. The idea that led to the creation of the Mirador Challenge was, in the first place, to make this formal network of “miradors” accessible to a far larger number of people who, in any other circumstance, would be uninformed of their existence. The secondary objective was to design a timed endurance walk that would cover a wide variety of terrain and serve as a complementary activity to Jávea’s already impressive calendar of sporting and recreational events. The current record for the distance is 3 hours and 55 minutes, although the average time to complete the course is close to six hours.

GENTLE STROLLS ABOUT JAVEA

It is not necessary to be an experienced hiker in order to appreciate the splendor of the Jávea region because the city offers activities suitable for people of all skill levels. A leisurely stroll around the historic center of the town will allow you to see some of the most significant landmarks in the city, such as the fortress church of San Bartolomé and the path that was once followed by the old walls that protected the village from raiding pirates. The lovely valley has some hidden delights that are easily accessible to everyone, such as an ancient olive tree and the old wells of the ancient cattle tracks. In contrast, the level plateau of La Plana provides some incredible views across the region while also bringing walkers to the base of the path that leads to the top of Montgó.

ENERGETIC WANDERS ABOUT JAVEA

Jávea provides a lot of options for visitors to enjoy just a little bit more of the natural beauty that surrounds the city for those who are looking for a bit of excitement without having to exert too much effort. Granadella Castle’s ruins can be seen at the extremity of a promontory that guards the bay of the same name. This promontory is at the end of a spectacular walk that clings to steep cliffs and provides access to the cove. There is an exciting steep ascent to the cavity of Cova Ampla, also known as the “Eye of Montgó,” which is located on the northern flanks of the Cabo de San Antonio and can be reached using an exciting loop that also includes the old watchtower of Torre del Gerro. The amazing Cova Tallada can be found on the northern flanks of the Cabo de San Antonio and can be reached using this exciting loop. In addition, the town is characterized by the presence of windmills, which have become a local landmark.

THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE MONTGO

The mountain of Montgó, which stands at a height of 752 meters, is the second tallest peak that is located so near to the water in the entirety of the Mediterranean region. It towers dramatically over the valley bottoms that are located all around it and can be seen for miles around. Ibiza, a Balearic island, can be seen on the horizon to the east from the peak of this mountain, while the Peon de Ifach (also known as Calpe Rock), the Sierra Bernia, and the Morro de Toix can be seen to the south. The Col de Rates, the Sierra de Aitana, and the Val de Laguart can be found to the west of the city of Valencia, while the Gulf of Oliva and Cullera can be found to the north of the city. Both of these regions lead up to the city of Valencia. There are a number of routes that can be taken to reach the peak, and each one deserves the utmost respect, particularly during the more turbulent winter months.

About the author: LGC
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